Civil society

CIVIL SOCIETY: Who belongs to it?
While descriptions vary across institutions the civil society ecosystem typically includes:
NGOs, non-profit organizations and civil society organizations (CSOs) that have an organized structure or activity and are typically registered entities and groups.
On-line groups and activities including social media communities that can be organized but do not necessarily have physical, legal or financial structures.
Social movements of collective action and/or identity, which can be on-line or physical.
Religious leaders, faith communities, and faith-based organizations.
Labour unions and Labour organizations representing workers.
Social entrepreneurs employing innovative and/or market oriented approaches for social and environmental outcomes.
Grassroots associations and activities at local level.
Cooperatives owned and democratically controlled by their members.
Here the focus is on civil society actors working positively to reduce societal harms and increase societal benefits. They aim to improve social cohesion; increase levels of economic and social development; reduce the burdens of poverty, ill-health and inequality; promote the interests of marginalized groups; extend the protection of social, civil and political rights; protect the environment, and provide services such as health, education and other forms of community development.

Birungi K. Desiderius
077 2 426 607
Executive Director
Better World Uganda
P. O. Box 406, Hoima-Uganda

Civil society

CIVIL SOCIETY: How do we define it?
A generally accepted and officially authorized definition of the civil society organizations does not exist, but according to the United Nations, civil society organizations are the following: “Not-for-profit, voluntary citizen groups, organized on a local, national and international level in order to raise public interest issues. Fully oriented and created by individuals with common interests, they perform various services and humanitarian functions; they represent the needs of the citizens before the governing structures, monitor the policies and programmes implementation and support the participation of the civil society sector on a community level.
On the other hand, CIVICUS defines the civil society as the space amid the family, state and the market, where people join in order to express their interests, by this definition one may conclude that the formal as well as the informal associations and networks are inclusive.

Birungi K. Desiderius
077 2 426 607
Executive Director
Better World Uganda
P. O. Box 406, Hoima-Uganda

Civil society

Dear keen reader, have you ever stopped and deeply thought about the Civil Society sector as a serious employer of any given State in the world over? And that, for any Civil society to thrive in its roles and and responsibilities of public interest, it is the priority of a given focused State? Which state is willing to commit even its resources for this noble cause? Dear keen reader, do you strongly believe that Civil Society is a complementary sector to the government, business and family at its best?

Birungi K. Desiderius
077 2 426 607
Executive Director
Better World Uganda
P. O. Box 406, Hoima-Uganda

Civil society

Birungi K. Desiderius
077 2 426 607
Executive Director
Better World Uganda
P. O. Box 406, Hoima-Uganda

Civil society

CIVIL SOCIETY: Watchdog, whistle blower?
Yes, the dog is described as the best animal friend to man, its owner. And the one with the whistle is either a master on duty in school or commander to the force. But when it comes to to describing one of the roles of civil society as watch dog/whistle blower it makes me very uncomfortable, we would rather describe this role as “Value Promoter”. This draws much more respect for this role in society. What is your opinion?

Birungi K. Desiderius
077 2 426 607
Executive Director
Better World Uganda
P. O. Box 406, Hoima-Uganda